Nuffnang Ads

Followers

Thursday, November 7, 2013

Family Style Stir Fry Teochew Noodles

Teochew noodle [aka Teochew mee teow in Hokkien] is quite new to me until after I was married.  My mother in-law is a Teochew and she just love this noodle so much that I got to see her cooking it very often.  But I don't really fancy this noodle as it uses lard and pork belly for frying.  It was later that I tried this noodle at a 'halal' hawker stall.  Being halal, no meat or lard was used yet the noodle tasted good just with fresh and dried prawns.  The hawker version has beansprouts and chives.  For home cooked version, we prefer to use leeks which makes the noodles more aromatic.

The noodle itself is quite salty to taste, has to be blanched in boiling water until cooked and soft but still chewy before frying.  It's not necessary to season with salt especially when serving it with sambal belacan.  I prefer to use the hand-made noodles that come from Hatyai, Thailand.
I prepared this for my MIL while she was in hospital.  After many days having hospital food, this was well received by her apart from my red bean soup and sweet potato soup.  All her favourites.
Ingredients
[serves 3-4]
250 gm Teochew noodles - loosen and cut to shorten the strands
2 tbsp oil
3 stalks of leek - washed and sliced slantwise or 1 inch length
1 small carrot - cut thin strips [optional]
100 gm meat - cut thin strips [you may use meat with some fats]
1 tbsp dried prawns - rinsed and coarsely chopped or keep whole
pepper and msg to taste
  1. Blanch noodles in boiling water until cooked and soft.  Place in colander and rinse under running water and drain.
  2. Heat oil in wok, fry meat until aromatic and firm.  Add dried prawns, fry until fragrant.
  3. Add in blanched noodles, stir fry to combine ingredients well.
  4. Add in  carrots and leeks.  Stir fry until vegetables are cooked.  Add in seasoning to taste.
  5. Sprinkle some water if you don't want the noodles dry - optional.
  6. Dish up to serve  with cut chillies or sambal belacan.
Notes: Visit this site for its' Nutritional Facts [here]

8 comments:

Anonymous said...

halo kimmy,,
may i know is this noodle same those orange colour type,aka "mee-teow"--n fried with koo chai,,n your noodles makes me luah nuah,,
with chilli padi,,,thanks
pin-singapore

Anonymous said...

halo kimmy,,
may i knoe is this mee teow same as the orange colour type n usualy
fried with koo chai,,the teochew style,,thanks--pin--singapore

Veronica Ng said...

This is my favourite noodle. My mum is a Teochew so we've grown up eating this noodle. But mother's version of this is very very simple - ku chai, taugeh and hae bee only. Yours look very delicious, Kimmy. PS. Hope your mother-in-law gets better soon.

Phong Hong said...

Kimmy, I haven't come across Teochew noodles before. Maybe I did not notice it on the shelves. Your story fry noodles looks delicious and what more served with sambal belacan. Hope your MIL gets well soon.

Kimmy said...

Thanks to all my dear fellow food bloggers for the well wishes. My MIL is back home and needs regular physiotherapy. Of course, she has to take note of doctor's advice to rest for at least 3 months.

Kimmy said...

Hi Anonymous, I've not come across the noodles that's orange colour but it is dried, QQ and not crispy like instant noodles before cooking. The Hatyai type is sold loose [each loop weighs about 500gm] while the local ones are all nicely wrapped in plastic. Sometimes, I do eat this with chilli padi.

Kimmy said...

Hi Veronica, your version is right with hae bee and kuchai. Since my MIL was on pork free meals at the hospital for several days, I chose to add meat to it, more ho liao to boost her appetite, hehehe!.

Kimmy said...

Hi Phong Hong, I think you can get this at the supermarts or Chinese grocery stalls at the wet market. Another way of eating this noodle is with 'Perut Ikan'. Believe me, it is very nice.

Nuffnang Ads

Blog Archive